Blog Archives

Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me! Episode 2 #150530


wwdpm-logo-marqueeGet ready for Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me!, the 5MDR Geeky Quiz.

This episode of Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me! broadcasts live from Charlotte, North Carolina.  Guests panelists for the show include Charlotte Geeks’ Joey Paquette, writer, martial artist, and ballroom dancer Edward McKeown, and author and storyteller Tally Johnson.  Listen as announcer Chuck Carte and host Doc Geressy engage panelists as they play Who’s the Panelist This Time?, Questions about the Geeky News, Bluff the Geek, Geeky Limerick Challenge, Warp Fill in the Blank, and Panelist Geeky Predictions.

If you are interested in booking Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me! for your convention, please contact Doc Geressy or Chuck Carte at 5MinuteDelayRadio@gmail.com.

Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me! Episode 2 – Click to Listen or Download

Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me!: Episode 2, Segment 1
Live from Charlotte, North Carolina/Who’s Our Panelist This Time?/Questions about the Geeky News

Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me!: Episode 2, Segment 2
Bluff the Geek

Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me!: Episode 2, Segment 3
Geeky Limerick Challenge

Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me!: Episode 2, Segment 4
Warp Fill in the Blank/Panelist Geeky Prediction

Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me! Episode 1 #141123


wwdpm-logo-marqueeGet ready for Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me!, the 5MDR Geeky Quiz.

This episode of Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me! broadcasts live from AtomaCon in Charleston South Carolina.  Guests panelists for the AtomaCon show include author and storyteller Tally Johnson, Podcasting’s Rich Sigfrit, and writer, actor, and director Chuck Carte.  Listen as Doc Geressy hosts and guests and panelists play Who’s the Panelist This Time?, Questions about the Geeky News, Bluff the Geek, Geeky Limerick Challenge, Warp Fill in the Blank, and Panelist Geeky Predictions.

If you are interested in booking Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me! for your convention, please contact Doc Geressy or Chuck Carte at 5MinuteDelayRadio@gmail.com.

Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me! Episode 1 – Click to Listen or Download

Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me!: Episode 1, Segment 1
Live from AtomaCon/Who’s Our Panelist This Time?/Questions about the Geeky News
Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me!: Episode 1, Segment 2
Bluff the Geek
Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me!: Episode 1, Segment 3
Geeky Limerick Challenge
Wait Wait…Don’t Phase Me!: Episode 1, Segment 4
Warp Fill in the Blank/Panelist Geeky Prediction

Sci-Fried Eggs Episode 80 #141112


sci-fried-eggs-logoThis week the Sci-Fried Eggs broadcast from the Bathurst Radio Production Unit Truck from Morganton Comic Con in Morganton, NC!  Chuck reviews Doctor Who Series 8 and the Eggs talk about the Amazon Echo.  Then Chuck and Doc discuss DC and Marvel’s Phase Announcements.  Chuck has a second Christmas Edition of Crap Chuck Found on the Internet.  And the Eggs bring you an interview with model, actress, and ghost hunter Eliza Jayne from Crystal Coast Con!

Sci-Fried Eggs Episode 80 – Click to Listen or Download

Sci-Fried Eggs: Episode 80, Segment 1
Doctor Who Series 8 Review

Sci-Fried Eggs: Episode 80, Segment 2
Amazon Echo

Sci-Fried Eggs: Episode 80, Segment 3
DC vs Marvel Phase Annoucements

Sci-Fried Eggs: Episode 80, Segment 4
Crap Chuck Found on the Internet #7: Christmas Edition Part 2

Sci-Fried Eggs: Episode 80, Segment 5
Eliza Jayne Interview

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Doc’s Do-It-Yourself Method


There are a lot of people who like to do things themselves.  Some are poor people.  Some are people who are gluttons for punishment.  And some are people who are all about doing things themselves because they can, or they get some sick sense of fulfillment, or they are hippies.  Now the whole Do-It-Yourself process is just like any other professional process.  It takes time and effort and a lot of luck.  Unless you’re me, then it just takes time.

There are lots of Do-It-Yourself methods out there.  Some are better than others.  And some are just plain stupid.  But most of them involved a few simple steps to achieve results.  Since I’m wicked smart (and good-looking) (and modest), a lot of people ask me, “Doc, what kind of Do-It-Yourself method do you follow?”  Well, I’m glad you asked!  I like to follow the patented Doc’s Do-It-Yourself Method!  What is Doc’s Do-It-Yourself Method?  Again, I’m glad you asked!

Here’s how Doc’s Do-It-Yourself Method works:

1. Access the problem or decide what you want to do.
2. Develop a plan of attack.
3. Research and develop.
4. Test said plan.
5. Execute plan.

Let’s go through the process with a little example.  Let’s say you want to build a bird house.  BAM!  You’ve already completed Step 1!  Deciding what you want to do is a step in itself!  You see, Doc’s Do-It-Yourself Method is all about the rewards!  Why waste time being disappointed right out of the gate when you can already feel like you’ve accomplished 20% of your goal!  I know, it’s awesome (I told you I was wicked smart).

Now on to Step 2.  Let’s develop that plan of attack.  We got to decide how we are we going to build this bird house?  There’s no reason to spend a lot of time coming up with our own ideas when lots of other chumps have shared their sweet ideas.  Let’s look on the Internet and see what kind of birdhouses other people are building.  Go ahead.  Take a look.  I’ll wait.  Yeah, I know, there’s a lot of stupid ways people are building bird houses, but there are a few (very few) diamonds in the rough.  So go ahead and pick a design you like.  Go ahead.  Pick one.  I’ll wait.  Did you pick a design you like?  Great!  That’s Step 2!  You’re 40% done!  That’s almost halfway!

Now Step 3 is where we have to take a trip to Lowes or Home Depot or Wal-mart or the Dollar Store (depending on your budget).  Step 3 is all about research and development.  You gotta see what materials are gonna cost you.  Then when you find out how expensive birdhouse stuff is, you spend some time looking for cheaper materials you can use.  You have to decide if you wanna use screws or nails or glue to secure your birdhouse.  Step 3 is not a rush step.  Take you time with Step 3.  Look things over and make some smart decisions.  Let’s face it, a birdhouse is a luxury for birds.  They’ve lived just fine for thousands of years without birdhouses.  They’ll be fine while you research your project.  So don’t rush things because you’re worried about the birds being cold and homeless.

Now to Step 4: the testing phase.  This is where you actually have materials and you start doing some building.  You’ll do a lot of measuring twice, cutting once, measuring again to see why the piece doesn’t fit, then measuring again and cutting again.  You’re going to spend a lot of time seeing what will actually work and what won’t.  You’ll find out things like maybe you need glue AND nails for this bird mansion you’re building.  Anyway, the point is test the waters and see what will work and what won’t in physical application.  I’ll go ahead and tell you that Step 3 and Step 4 are another 40% of the plan that will take like 80% of your time.  Don’t worry.  Great (and patented) Do-It-Yourself methods like this one take time.

Now on to Step 5!  Execute that plan!  Make that birdhouse.

Just so you know, like Roy Underhill on The Woodwright’s Shop or Graham Kerr on The Galloping Gourmet, I’ve been building a birdhouse as I’ve been writing this essay.  And I’ve been using Doc’s Do-It-Yourself Method.

Here’s what mine looks like.

Bird-Mansion

Yours probably looks more like this.

birdhouse-bad

Hey, don’t worry.  You gotta break some legs to make some omelets, or something like that.  And you’ve gotta make some whatever the hell it is you’ve made before you make a passable birdhouse.  Keep trying.  And you may want to maybe pick some better plans from the Internet.  Just remember, Doc’s Do-It-Yourself Method is like playing the harp.  It takes time to master.  Good luck!

My Workshop is Going to Be Awesome


I’m opening up my own workshop.  I do a lot of cool stuff that warrants having a proper workshop.  I sew stuff.  I screw things together (not a euphemism).  I bolt things.  Sometimes I cut things in a dangerous manner with metal snips.  I use hobby knives and other sharp objects without wearing gloves.  Sometimes I paint things in areas without proper ventilation.  I often use power tools without wearing safety glasses (I’m actually probably lucky to have both eyes).  In fact, I don’t even own a pair of safety glasses (so really lucky), but I would at least own safety glasses if I had my own workshop.

And quite frankly, I’m getting tired of working in places that aren’t suited for a workshop.  And, trust me, there are a lot of them.  I used to have a work area in my mom’s basement, but she kicked me out and turned the entire thing into a Zen garden (thanks a lot, Dr. Oz).  Seriously, it looks like Ace Hardware is having a rake sale in the Sahara Desert down there.  Then I worked in the spare bedroom of an apartment I was living in.  And my roommate was none too happy about that situation when she found out what I was using her room for while she was at work.  For a short time, my workshop was in the supply closet at the office where I worked.  But after I was terminated decided to move on for using a blow torch in the supply closet and setting a bunch of chemicals on fire causing several thousands of dollars worth of damage over creative differences, I had to move my shop elsewhere.  I worked out of the trunk of my car for a while (my car has a really big trunk), but that made me feel kind of vagranty, not to mention there was never quite enough room for activities or to sit upright when the trunk was closed.

My current workshop setting is a small unused area in a strip mall behind a Rue21.  It’s not ideal.  And I can’t run power tools during business hours.  And the manager prefers that I spray paint after business hours as well.  Not to mention, they don’t want me to store any kind of harmful or flammable chemicals (which is like 99% of chemicals) there.  It’s just not a productive or encouraging work environment.  And the Rue21 bathroom is back there, and, even though it is supposed to be for “employees only,” all those girls who work up front let their friends and any other nice-enough-looking customer who asks come back there to use the facilities.  And looking through racks of somewhat reasonably prices clothes must make women have to go pee, because that bathroom gets more foot traffic than the Big Butter Jesus (if you don’t know, Google it).  Some days it’s so busy you’d think they were giving out free shit in that bathroom.  And with all those ladies wandering back through there, that leads to a lot of questions like, “What are you doing back here?” and “What are you working on?” and “Are you supposed to be back here?”  I don’t come all up in Rue21 while you’re shopping and interrogate you!

So that’s why I’m really need my own workshop.  And that workshop is going to be awesome.  There’s going to be all kinds of cool stuff in it.  There will be a ton of tools.  Like a literal ton of them.  Maybe even two tons if I get the nice tools.  I’m going to have a welder and an air hose to pump up tires and blow air up unsuspecting women’s skirts.  I’ll have a drill press and a band saw.  And a lathe!  And a planer!  I’ll have lots of work areas with plenty of easily accessible power outlets.  I’ll have a grease pit and a vehicle lift and a big rolly toolbox.  And there will be a paint booth so everything I own doesn’t have overspray on it.  And I’ll have lots of coffee cans full of nuts and bolts and washers.

And that’s just the basics.  The best part of my workshop is going to be the things that really make a workshop awesome.  There will be some neon beer signs.  And I’ll have to have some metal beer signs too.  I’ll probably have a NASCAR hood from Hut Stricklin or Phil Parsons or Ricky Rudd, or, depending on how big my workshop is, all three!  There will be some comfortable couches to lounge on when you aren’t working on something or if you just want to take a nap.  I’ll have a bathroom with a urinal that goes all the way to the floor.  I’m going to have a drink machine that has Yoohoo and Vanilla Coke and Red Stripe.  I’ll have the best snack machine ever.  It will have Twinkies and Crunch Bars and condoms (just in case) and Fruit Stripes Gum and Newport cigarettes for the guys and Misty 120s for the ladies!

I’ll be able to build all kinds of cool stuff in my workshop!  I can finally make a full-sized ED-209 (from the original Robocop, not the new one).  I’ll be able to finish the half-scale Harrier jet that I started out of popsicle sticks in the 9th grade.  I can fully realize my dream of building a car out of cotton swabs that runs off of bubble gum!  I can play shuffleboard indoors!  Working by moonlight will be a planned luxury, not a temporal inconvenience.

I’m so excited about my workshop I can hardly stand it.  I just need to round up the land, the building, the permits, and all the other stuff that building a shop entails.  So if you know how to build a workshop and wouldn’t mind giving me some pointers, ask to use the bathroom at the Rue21 in Franklin Square Phase III and let’s chat.

Ask BatDoc #140116


Dear BatDoc,

Do you know any interesting DIY (do it yourself) methods?  For like props or stuff?  Can you give me any tips?

HenaT

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Dear HenaT,

The whole process of DIY is just like any other professional process.

I like to follow the patented BatDoc Do It Yourself Method!

1. Access the problem or decide what you want to do.
2. Develop a plan of attack.
3. Research and develop.
4. Test said plan.
5. Execute plan.

Let’s say you want to build a bird house.  BAM!  You’ve already completed Step 1!  Deciding what you want to do is a step in itself!  The BatDoc DIY Method is all about the rewards!

Now how are we going to build that bird house? Let’s look online and see what other people are doing.  Go ahead.  Take a look.  I’ll wait.

Yeah, I know, there’s a lot of stupid ways people are building bird houses, but there are a few diamonds in the rough.  So did you pick a design you like? Great! That’s Step 2!

Step 3 is where we have to take a trip to Lowes or Home Depot or Wal-mart or the Dollar Store (depending on your budget).  Research and develop.  See what materials cost.  See if there are cheaper materials you can use.  Do you want to use screws or nails or glue to secure your birdhouse.  Take some time and look things over.  Let’s face it, this is a luxury for birds.  They’ve lived just fine for thousands of years without birdhouses.  They’ll be fine while you research your project.

Now to the testing phase.  This is where you actually have materials.  You start doing some cutting and you see what will actually work and what won’t.  Maybe you need glue AND nails for this bird mansion you’re building.  Anyway, point is, test the waters and see what will work and what won’t in physical application.

Now for Step 5.  Execute that plan!  Make that birdhouse.

I’ve been building a birdhouse as I’ve been writing this using the BatDoc DIY Method.

Here’s what mine looks like.
Bird-Mansion

Yours probably looks more like this.

birdhouse-bad

Don’t worry.  Keep trying.  The BatDoc DIY Method is like playing the harp.  It takes time to master.  Good luck!

Love,
BatDoc

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